How Social Media Can Hurt Your Construction Injury Case

By Neil Kalra


If you’ve been hurt in a construction accident, your first reaction is probably to share this news with friends in your social media networks. And yet, it’s best for any injury claims you file, even workers’ compensation, to refrain from posting anything – even if it has nothing directly to do with your accident – on your Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, etc. accounts.

We all have grown used to the habit of documenting our lives on social media, and upload photos and other interesting news to share. But that’s what you should not do in a personal injury case because the defense will use those postings to try and reduce – or even deny – your claim, no matter how innocent they may be.

The Many Ways Social Media can Torpedo Your Legitimate Claim

Innocent posts can reduce your compensation because an entry can be misinterpreted or “spun” to make you less credible. This could leave you with an unfavorable settlement that doesn’t cover your expenses. Or you could get nothing at all. Here are some social media posts you must avoid making.

  • Posts that compromise your Claim: When you reassure your friends that “you’re fine and getting better,” the insurer takes that to mean your injuries weren’t serious and you are in no emotional distress.

  • Photos that suggest you’re actually fine: If you’re having a fun day at the beach while “recovering” from your injury and are asking for disability, the insurance company will suspect that you CAN work and are NOT experiencing pain and suffering.

  • Comments about the accident: You may want to share details about the accident or the other party involved. Don’t say anything about your case because it could be also used as ammunition against you.

  • Tagged Posts: These are dangerous too; even if you had nothing to do with the post. If this happens, remove yourself from the post; then ask your friend to remove you, or delete the post and ask your friend not from tag you until you say it’s ok.

Other Good Ideas to Help You Fly “Under the Radar”

Check all your social media accounts’ privacy and security settings. For the duration of your claim it’s a good idea to change all settings to private so you can control who sees your profile. This, however, doesn’t guarantee your posts won’t be viewed by those in “public.”

Deleted posts are not gone forever. They could be somewhere in the platform’s archive. The best social media post is the one that’s never made.

Since social media can easily complicate personal injury cases, staying away from these platforms until your claim is settled is a very good idea. But we know how hard that can be. And yet, staying away means you won’t inadvertently provide the very ammunition your opposing insurance company searches for to assail or deny your claim.

So if you can’t stay off, never say anything about the wreck, even in passing. Insurance companies know how to use social media against you. Too many times their investigators and claims adjusters use it to destroy legitimate injury claims by “spinning” innocent postings by injured accident victims to their advantage. We see it happen all the time.

Whether you or a family member was injured due to a car accident, commercial vehicle accident, or semi-truck accident, you may be entitled to full benefits and compensation. Know your rights and get the answers you deserve. The attorneys at Kalra Law Firm are dedicated to getting car accident victims the compensation they deserve. Call our office now to speak with one of our experienced car accident lawyers to represent you in your case. We offer a free initial consultation and will not charge unless we win your case. Call our New York City and Queens car accident lawyers today if you have any questions about a car accident you were involved in. Call us at (718) 897-2211 www.unionlawyer.com

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